"Reality TV" Exhibition

The relationship between a man and the place is an open relationship. It will remain in his conscience. It does not end even if he has left the place. The feelings that the place leaves in the human soul are endless feelings. They are inherent in the self. They can quickly jump into presence with their overwhelming intensity as if they were on the highest alert and attendance, although they did not appear so, or may be this is how they show.
When you kill the place, and it becomes difficult for the means of expression to describe that violation of the beauty, while the picture confuses the conscience…
How do you see the place?
— Hany Musallam, Riyadh, July 2012

Tomelilla konsthall presents


Hany Musallam and Torbjörn Larsson
2013.02.02-2013.03.17

Opening on February 2nd. 13:00

Opening Speaker Jan Hjärpe, professor emeritus of Islamology, adviser to the Government and an expert on Mellanösternfrågor.

Hany Musallam, a Palestinian artist who lives with his family in Riyadh in Saudi Arabia, where he lived since 2002. He has also managed to establish his own company focusing on photography. Today, through this exhibition
tion, he takes us on a journey to the place he was born and raised, his homeland, which he left for twenty years ago.

Hany was born in Gaza in 1974, where he grew up and went to one of the UN schools for Palestinian refugees. He completed his schooling in 1991 and received a year later scholarship by the British Council for a year of studies at the Wimbledon School of Art and Design in London. Just a few days after his return from England, he lost his older brother in the fighting during the first intifada. In 1993, he received another scholarship, this time from Polish Ministry of Culture, to start on a six-year master program at The Strzeminski Academy of Fine Arts in Lodz in Poland. He graduated in fashion design and photography in 1999. Later, when he was living in Moscow, he participated in several exhibitions, both in Europe and the Middle East.

Reality TV
“The relationship between a man and the place is an open relationship.  It will remain in his conscience.  It does not end even if he has left the place. The feelings that the place leaves in the human soul are endless feelings.  They are inherent in the self.  They can quickly jump into presence with their overwhelming intensity as if they were on the highest alert and attendance, although they did not appear so, or may be this is how they show.

When you kill the place, and it becomes difficult for the means of expression to describe that violation of the beauty, while the picture confuses the conscience… How do you see the place?”

/ Hany Musallam


Torbjörn Larsson during his childhood on a farm outside Linköping he got through school friends, originating from the Balkans. Their parents had come to Sweden during the 50 - and 60's, as labor migrants. Kompi circuits were born in Sweden. During high school, he met jämnåriga who fled Iran-Iraq war and sought asylum in Sweden. Awareness of the situation to the consignor of its context as a refugee arose in his mind. These insights contributed greatly to the interest in the documentary image.
Trained photographer in Documentary photojournalism at the International Centre of Photography in New York. Represented breed of Redux Pictures in New York.

This is a bildberättelse of Yousif & Ghadah.
"One morning, I read an article in one of the major Swedish newspapers, the number of immigrants and refugees that have so far come to Sweden. A stereotypical photo of a refugee behind a fence enhances the article.
Who is a refugee and where does it come from? When is the picture taken? No clues.
The debate about integration and refugee policy is remarkable. No one seems to know anything about the people behind the statistics. It's all about demonstrating that it costs too much money, they do not integrate, et cetera. The more liberal forces in Sweden today claiming humanity and solidarity. Very few seem to be interested in the refugee. Men are more interested to express their views. Politically correct or not.
To me it was obvious that when a person becomes a refugee becomes even history-. A stereotype of a magazine. No one knows you.
/ Torbjörn Larsson



The photographer Hany Musallam is from Palestine but living in Saudi Arabia and Torbjörn lives in Borris, although he is a photographer. Both deal with different angles of what is happening in the Gaza Strip.

Hany from an exile perspective where his only chance of documentation is through TV - Real TV, as he calls it ... and Torbjörn because he can physically enter, Torbjörn also shows images from Syria. It can not Hani as exiled Palestinians and paperless “....

The photo exhibition from a bombed and completely destroyed Gaza on the retina, I try to put myself in the memories I’d had with me if I myself was a refugee and how hard I had to accept that my homestead “earthly paradise” may no longer went to visit If I, as these people came from a war-torn zone, got to escape and once wanted to return home ...
— "mittosterlen"


Articles Links:  

http://mittosterlen.se/2013/03/12/ta-inte-allt-for-givet/ 

http://www.fotosidan.se/cldoc/40-fotoutstallningar-i-skane-under-mars.htm

http://vardagenspolitik.se/som-att-bli-utsatt-for-ett-jordskalv/ 

http://www.almnatiq.net/index.php?page=news&ID=5008

http://www.ystadsallehanda.se/kultur-och-noje/article1812359/Radsla-och-forhoppning.html

http://www.skanesfria.nu/artikel/96221



Ystads Allehanda article published on 09.02.2013, By Bengt Eriksson

Article by: Lars Kobbe, Feb 2013

Ystads Allehanda article published on 02.02.2013, By Ulf Martensson